We Are The Lambda Generation. LambdaGeneration is a website dedicated to the video game Half-Life. ( We're basically really passionate about crowbars, headcrabs and anyone who has goatee with a PhD in theoretical physics… )

Combine OverWiki, The Original Half-Life and Portal Wiki, Turns 10

As of today, February 12th 2016, CombineOverwiki - The original Half-Life and Portal Wiki, turns 10 years old.

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Half-Life Backwarding?

Half-Life

Recently, GoldSrc speedrunner “quadrazid“, previously famous for his 20 minute Half-Life 1 speedrun, uploaded a video of what he calls “Half-Life Backwarding”, which is exactly what it is.

In the short video, quadazid attempts to make his way through various Half-Life levels such as the Hazard Course as fast as he can, but this time facing backwards.

If you thought normal Half-Life speedruns are crazy enough, then this has just taken it to a whole new level.

Welcome to the New LambdaGeneration!

Other Welcome to the New LambdaGeneration!

Hello and welcome to the new LambdaGeneration!

It’s been a while since LambdaGeneration was last on your screens, but the good news is we’re back and ready to re-serve the Valve Community with a whole line of new features and fresh content.

You maybe asking: Why did LambdaGeneration go offline for so long?

Well the answer to that lies between two factors, one being our hosting expired, which would have cost a lot of money and time to renew and restore the previous site. The other, being that the site was already in a poor state due to the departure of Vic and the general lack of content at the time. It was therefore decided to hold the site and focus all efforts on creating the new one.

You may also be wondering: How come it took so long?

The answer to that is of course, Valve Time. (Or that making a bespoke WordPress theme from scratch is pretty damn hard!)

Half-Life on the Master System

Half-Life

Over at PixelJoint.com, a user by the name of ‘robotwo‘ posted a handful of screenshots for his development of Half-Life on the Master System, a console released by Sega back in 1985.

The game is indeed an actual playable game, and according to robotwo it has taken around 6,000 lines of code just to create the four rooms shown in his post. Gordon may look a bit chubby, but robotwo explains that he wanted to keep him as readable as possible on such a small scale (due to the limitations of the Sega Master System).

Also while any further details are bare, be sure to check out his undertaking.

Making The Sandvich

Team Fortress Making The Sandvich

As you know, I have just returned from my perilous journey in Timbuktu, where the Internet and Half-Life are outlawed! Hit that “More” button to hear about my adventures!

Half-Life Alpha Dating From September 1997, Finds Its Way Online After 15 Years

Half-Life Half-Life Alpha Dating From September 1997, Finds Its Way Online After 15 Years

The original Half-Life was first announced in early 1997, initially set for that year’s holiday season. But one very impressive E3 1997 showing later, and suddenly Half-Life was on everyone’s radar – expectations were ramping up, and suddenly, Valve were in the center of the gaming world’s attention. And so, later that year, close to their projected release date, Valve decided that a delay was in order. Once they’d attained it, a lot of the pressure was off, and the team at Valve spent began to intensely evaluate every aspect of the game, and all of the content they had created in one year of development.

And while there had been a considerable amount of progress, and the game itself was in very good shape, it just seemed like there was something missing – as Valve engineer Ken Birdwell stated in The Final Hours of Half-Life, the game simply wouldn’t have gone “over the edge anywhere“. To Valve, it seemed like Half-Life could be a lot more revolutionary and a lot more groundbreaking. Thus, in late 1997, an entire game’s worth of content and design was completely scrapped, and Half-Life underwent a complete redesign, fully from the ground up.

What gamers eventually got one year later in November of 1998, amounts to an entirely new game (in fact, according to Ken Birdwell, it really is a Half-Life 2 of sorts). But what happened to the Half-Life that never was – the “Half-Life 0” that Valve unceremoniously threw out the door?

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