We Are The Lambda Generation. LambdaGeneration is a website dedicated to the video game Half-Life. ( We're basically really passionate about crowbars, headcrabs and anyone who has goatee with a PhD in theoretical physics… )

How Opposing Force Dealt with the Expansion Pack Problem

An examination of the strengths of Half-Life's weapon system, and how the Opposing Force expansion pack both compromised and built upon them.

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Opposing Force Beta Trailer

Half-Life

The original and maybe the only trailer made for Gearbox’s Half-Life: Opposing Force.

Half-Life: Opposing Force is one of the expansion packs for the original Half-Life. It was developed by Gearbox Software and was published by Sierra on November 1st, 1999. The story follows Adrian Shephard, a corporal from the Hazardous Environment Combat Unit that has been called to silence the Black Mesa Research Facility and clean up the mess caused by the Resonance Cascade.

What Makes a Free-to-Play Game Successful?

Gaming Industry What Makes a Free-to-Play Game Successful?

This is an editorial by Aabicus which analyses the successfulness of free-to-play games in the gaming industry with relation to Team Fortress 2. All views expressed here are his own.

The Free-to-play model is the current trend in multiplayer online games at the moment, most frequently seen in MMOs, MOBAs and shooters. Since several high-profile games (including Team Fortress 2) proved the model worked, the gaming industry have seen a staggering amount of F2P releases, some of whom keep their revenue-enhancing devices subtle and others who make real-world money the most valuable resource a player can have.

‘Mods Going Retail.’ Sounds Fantastic, but at What Cost?

Steam ‘Mods Going Retail.’ Sounds Fantastic, but at What Cost?

Many moons ago, you might remember an article we posted about how Valve had given the Black Mesa team (now known as the Crowbar Collective) the opportunity to sell their mod as a full retail product. Despite announcing that a Source SDK 2013 version of Black Mesa would also be available for free, the announcement was met with mixed criticism. There was an overwhelming amount of support for the team, but there were a number of people who were concerned with what ‘ethical’ implications this choice to go retail might have. Should community made content that has always been available for free suddenly be given the chance to be monetized?

The Girl In Gordon’s Black Mesa Locker Is 14 Years Old, Today

Half-Life The Girl In Gordon’s Black Mesa Locker Is 14 Years Old, Today

Seasoned Half-Life fans will, without a doubt, remember the contents of Gordon Freeman’s locker in the Anomalous Materials locker room at Black Mesa, right down to the tiniest of objects. But there is one that stands out, even years after the game’s release: a picture of a baby girl. Fans have speculated on what exactly this means for Gordon: did he have a daughter? Or is she Alyx Vance? Or… Chell? Half-Life writer Marc Laidlaw has stated that this may simply be a relative, or a relative’s child: perhaps a niece, or a goddaughter. But most fans don’t know who the girl really is. Well, you’re about to find out.

The Problem with Steam Trading Cards

Steam The Problem with Steam Trading Cards

With Valve having recently released the full version of their new ‘Steam Trading Cards’ feature, after a surprisingly short beta period, there has been much discussion around the Internet about the purpose and usefulness of the system. Some have praised the system as another way for allowing users to get more involved in the Steam Community, and rewarding dedicated Steam users; others, however, have criticized the system as being gimmicky and even exploitative, and nothing more than a money-making scheme on Valve’s part.

A quick run-down for those of you who are unfamiliar with the system: Steam Trading Cards allows users to receive random trading cards for playing various games, which they can then craft into ‘badges’ in order to increase their ‘Steam level,’ a new, RPG-like feature added to Steam. Higher Steam levels grant users additional Steam features, such as the ability to customize their Steam profiles further, or have larger friends lists. Trading cards can obviously be traded with other users, and can also be sold for money. At first glance, the system seems like a fantastic idea: it rewards you for playing games you like, which you can then use to unlock additional features; meanwhile, people not interested can simply ignore the system altogether. Thus, everybody is happy. The truth is not that simple, however.

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